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Microsoft KNEW 360s were scratching discs, but basically said "f*** off"

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xbox_360_scratch_suit.jpg

^ What happened to my Rock Band 2 and Gears of War 2. >_> What did they tell me? "Your own fault is it, sorry please do move not your console while playing the game in console, buy you is must another game from store." The kicker? I *didn't* move the console. It was in it's laying-down position, and it did it all buy it's lonesome. Now I'm out ~$110 retail for the two games (roughly $55+ each now)....

Now that the rant is over:

Unsealed Documents in a lawsuit over an Xbox 360 that repeatedly scratched a dude's games reveal that Microsoft knew all about the problem, but rejected all three possible solutions prior to the 360's launch.

Of course, this isn't exactly shocking—Dean Takahashi revealed just how startlingly troubled the Xbox 360 was from the get-go. Hiro Umeno, a Microsoft program manager, said in a declaration about the disc-scratching problem that "This is ... information that we as a team, optical disc drive team, knew about. When we first discovered the problem in September or October (2005), when we got a first report of disc movement, we knew this is what's causing the problem."

The solutions considered—and rejected—were to increase the magnetic field of the disc holder (could've interfered with the disc opening and closing), slowing the disc speed (could've increased load time) and to install small bumpers (too expensive, costing between $35 million and $75 million). Instead, they went with a warning in the manual not to move the console with the discs still inside, a warning that Microsoft itself thought was insufficient, according to an internal email. A consultant for the plaintiff notes that Sony and Nintendo "almost always incorporate the possibility that a console could be moved while a disc is rotating inside in the designs of their products."

Moral of the story seems to be not to buy rev. A hardware from Microsoft.

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PS3's did this when they were first released as well.

Sony eventually fixed the problem.

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...and to install small bumpers (too expensive, costing between $35 million and $75 million).

Pocket change for Microsoft.

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wth dude.. i just bought my 360 and i dun want any of these problems on my console.. why is M$ getting sooo ****y!

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It's sorta hit or miss... my 360 was purchased Xmas 2005 and has worked flawlessly since... what's that smoke smell...?

Seriously though, I called MS support once too because of the NXE screwing up network connection to my mp3; as effective as trying to get your 3 year-old to fix a cold fusion engine with a tooth ache, and far more painful to listen to. :slant:

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This is a typical case of cost-calculation. I'm certain it was just cheaper to ignore some of the users-complains and to pay some compensation to the obstinate users, than to change their hardware.

But I'm sure they don't calculate in their loose of reputation! I'm sure they will loose money in the end...

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well that sucks because i just got my xbox this xmas. but i wonder, what is MS coming to. like is it just me or are they getting realy s@!#y.

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